collapse

Author Topic: Help Diagnosing Reverb Drive & Return Circuit?  (Read 3684 times)

Theors

  • SSGuitar Regular
  • ***
  • Posts: 25
  • Chip Points: 0
    • View Profile
Help Diagnosing Reverb Drive & Return Circuit?
« on: November 23, 2015, 08:22:42 AM »
Straight to the point......eliminated Foot Switch....replaced both RCA wires from PCB to the Reverb tank....replaced Accutronics Reverb tank....connected a speaker to the Reverb Drive wire, the results were a low uncontrollable guitar sound. Volume/Master or Reverb POT made no change to the guitar signal during this test. What's my next move?
My Amp is a Tube Works RT-2100. The date on PCB is 1991.
The problem is the Reverb effect suddenly dropped to approximately 10% of it's potential.
Attached is the Wiring diagram I obtained from this SSAmp forums.

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
'82 Carvin DC200 + others

Enzo

  • Legendary
  • ******
  • Posts: 1839
  • Chip Points: 189
    • View Profile
Re: Help Diagnosing Reverb Drive & Return Circuit?
« Reply #1 on: November 23, 2015, 02:00:29 PM »
Don't just guess and replace a lot of stuff, isolate the problem.   Is it the drive side or the return side with the problem?   Touch the tips of the two RCA cords, while the amp is running and the reverb contrl up midway.  Does one hum?  That one is for the return, which plugs into the OUTPUT on the reverb pan.  Does touching that one give a strong hum, or is that still 10%?

If that is weak, the reverb signal flows through the reverb control, then through a J112 JFET before mixing into the main signal path.  The amp works OK otherwise, right?  SO I can assume the main signal path is OK?  Is that J112 fully on?  No voltage at its gate holding it off?  It is controlled by P which has its circuit upper right.

Theors

  • SSGuitar Regular
  • ***
  • Posts: 25
  • Chip Points: 0
    • View Profile
Re: Help Diagnosing Reverb Drive & Return Circuit?
« Reply #2 on: November 23, 2015, 05:17:47 PM »
The amp works just fine. I'll do the "touch tip test" this evening and get back with results. The PCB is clearly marked "RD = Drive" and " RR = Return"
Thx
'82 Carvin DC200 + others

Theors

  • SSGuitar Regular
  • ***
  • Posts: 25
  • Chip Points: 0
    • View Profile
Re: Help Diagnosing Reverb Drive & Return Circuit?
« Reply #3 on: November 24, 2015, 01:02:36 AM »
Well...thank you so much for the "Tip of the Return Circuit" hum test! This is a used amp that I've had for some time now. It seems that the return circuit was reversed! The outside of the RCA cord, just touching it, gave a hugh hum! The tip...nothing. Well I knew that was wrong! So I soldered it correctly AND I think it's working like it's supposed to....meaning, what I thought was normal reverb effect was waaaaay outta whack! Never able to turn the POT up more than 3 or 4. After realizing the original tank "Accutronics Reverb Tank 9AB1C1B" has a decay time of 1.2 to 2.0 secs (short), it seems to be working like it should. I just hope it didn't damage any components of the reverb circuit. The new tank I got has a decay time of 1.75 to 3.00 secs (medium). So buying I new tank without isolating the problem wasn't a total lose :loco Thanks again......
'82 Carvin DC200 + others

Enzo

  • Legendary
  • ******
  • Posts: 1839
  • Chip Points: 189
    • View Profile
Re: Help Diagnosing Reverb Drive & Return Circuit?
« Reply #4 on: November 24, 2015, 02:04:19 AM »
I'm full of tips.  Someday I will share my chili recipe.

J M Fahey

  • SSGuitar Global Mod
  • Legendary
  • ****
  • Posts: 4141
  • Chip Points: 429
    • View Profile
Re: Help Diagnosing Reverb Drive & Return Circuit?
« Reply #5 on: November 27, 2015, 10:04:32 PM »
PLEASE DO   :dbtu: :dbtu: :dbtu: :dbtu: :dbtu:

Just by sheer coincidence yesterday I bought some 20 pounds of beans  :o , both Navy and Black, I'm soaking about a pound for tomorrow, now I need different recipes to use them  <3)

Enzo

  • Legendary
  • ******
  • Posts: 1839
  • Chip Points: 189
    • View Profile
Re: Help Diagnosing Reverb Drive & Return Circuit?
« Reply #6 on: November 28, 2015, 03:05:38 AM »
it is a whole document, I'll have to trim it up to share.  I'll dig it up.


I have been cooking a lot of beans lately.  Mostly soaked then simmered beans, with a ham hock or ham bone for flavor.  A large onion diced, a large carrot diced.  Carrot adds color and a little flavor.  Last pot I diced a parsnip in there too, kinda like a carrot, but a stronger taste I think I will leave out in the future.  Sometimes a potato diced in there adds a little creaminess as it breaks down.  Black pepper and hot pepper flakes, and of course ample salt.  Doesn't need to be more complicated that that for beans.  Fresh baked corn bread goes well.

Navy and black beans are good, and I have been using cranberry beans a lot, available locally, Michigan grows a lot of beans.  I used to order in Anasazi beans, I like them a lot.

J M Fahey

  • SSGuitar Global Mod
  • Legendary
  • ****
  • Posts: 4141
  • Chip Points: 429
    • View Profile
Re: Help Diagnosing Reverb Drive & Return Circuit?
« Reply #7 on: November 28, 2015, 08:10:46 AM »
Thanks  :dbtu:

Enzo

  • Legendary
  • ******
  • Posts: 1839
  • Chip Points: 189
    • View Profile
Re: Help Diagnosing Reverb Drive & Return Circuit?
« Reply #8 on: December 06, 2015, 02:25:28 AM »
Made a pot of split pea soup yesterday.  Split peas cook up in about an hour, no need to soak them.

Quote
The magic of chili

Some folks just go to burger joints, some have progressed to hamburger helper, but the real folk cook their own.  I know we all have to start somewhere.  Tuna noodle casserole, lasagna, that thing with the green beans and the little onion rings, they are all just recipes.  But chili now,  that's a whole other thing.  Chili isn't a recipe, it is a philosophy.  Dare we say a mirror on life.  Some folks are white bread, vanilla, mayo, velveeta...  they like the mild, bland barely chili stuff that might as well be spaghetti sauce with beans.  Other folks are hang glider, Ferrari, Tabasco sauce, Aruba, steak rare... they like the chili that makes your face sweat, the hurt-your-mouth stuff.  But hey, it's all still chili.  Your chili reflects you.  I'm hard core, I like the Marquis de Sade chili, but then my idea of a good date involves handcuffs and swim fins.  You may prefer the Pat Boone, Donnie and Marie chili.

Just like Beauty, we each have our own idea what chili should be.  Each idea is different, like snowflakes.  But just like snowflakes, there are certain basic qualities that all chili must possess.  In the broader sense, there are chilis based on chicken, vegetarian chili, fruit chili (I swear to God), and other similar offenses, but real chili has to be based on tomatoes and beef.  Beyond that, there's a lot of leeway.  Thick, thin and soupy, beans, no beans. 

The bigger the mess you make, the better stuff tastes.

This isn't a recipe, this is just an explanation of my approach, so there aren't going to be amounts for the ingredients.  That said, I guess it's only fair that I give some idea what I consider a pot of chili to be.  My average pot starts with about two pounds of beef.  Adding all the other things and water yields about three quarts.  Adjust to suit.

Though you can make a pot of chili all in the same pot, I prefer to start in a skillet.  If you are lazy, do it all in the pot.  Put a big heavy skillet on the burner, and throw in a little grease.  Oh, I'm a 90s guy, I use a tablespoon of olive oil, but you could use bacon grease or beef fat or even a little Crisco.  Select your beef.  Serious chili cooks take a round steak or a chuck steak and dice it up, but I think ground beef works just fine.  Ground chuck or round is best.  Beef in skillet, break it up , and brown it.  I use a relatively high heat.

We need some onion in there.  I like lots.  For my pot, I chop up one of them grapefruit sized things, or a couple large ones, or a whole passel of the little ones.  Lots of onions.  I am especially fond of Vidalia onions, but any variety will do.  Dice them  or chop them up pretty well.  Our onions need to be sauted til cooked through, don't brown them too much.  I just throw the onions in with the beef.  Cook them up together.  Sometimes I am so clever.  If you like garlic, now's the time for that, too.  I use two or three big fat cloves of garlic diced fine.  Since garlic turns bitter if overcooked, toss it in near the end of this step.  Garlic only needs a couple minutes to cook.  Garlic can handle the long simmer, it just doesn't like to be on the skillet too long.

OK, I admit it.  I often buy a jar of chopped garlic at the store.  Why deal with the peel when you are in a hurry?

Now is also the time to cook the peppers  I always add a handful of hot peppers.  Though they add to the "heat", I mainly add them for flavor.  I'll get the heat from the seasonings.  You can use a piece of plain old green bell pepper, but don't go overboard or there will be too much "green" flavor.  I use several jalapenos or serranos.  remove the seeds and other stuff from the middle, chop them up, then throw them in with the meat and onions.  Yes, one big happy saute skillet full of stuff.  I like a variety of peppers, but serranos are my favorites.  Don’t care for the curry-like taste of habaneros.

Now that you have chopped up the hot peppers, don't rub your eyes.  The hot juice is not so easy to wash off.  I never let my knife hand touch the peppers, keeps it "cool" for eye-rubbing and other stuff.

After you've sizzled your beef and veggies to a lovely brown, spoon off the excess grease, then dump it all in the pot.  Not the grease, dump the beef stuff in the pot.  Make soap or candles or something from the left over grease.  Over medium heat, we now start to add the liquids. 

I must digress.  Some folks start with a pot of water and throw all the ingredients in.  While this works, the beef tastes boiled.  By browning the meat first, the sugars and other things in the meat carmelize, giving a better flavor.  Boiling cooks at 200 degrees or so, while the skillet cooks at 400 degrees or so.  Nothing will carmelize in 200 degree water. 

Oops, the pot is starting to sizzle.  Dump in a can of tomato sauce or puree.  If you really like a lot of tomato flavor, use two cans.  Just basic sauce, nothing fancy.  Fill the can half way with warm water, slosh it around and dump it in too.  Wouldn't want to leave the tiniest bit in the can, would we?  Pour in a can of beer, after of course you take a good healthy taste just to check for freshness.  Now I like beer and all, but I have to admit that it doesn't really add a lot of flavor, it adds a more subtle touch.  But it really impresses the onlookers, so make sure someone is watching when you do it.   Open a couple cans of beans and pour off the liquid into the pot, but don't add the beans themselves until the end.  Add water to the desired consistency.  Sometimes I like it thin and brothy, so long as it has a rich flavor.  Sometimes I add less water and cook it down until it is very thick. 

Let us speak of beans.  We all know they are the musical fruit, but we need to chose the right bean for the job here.  Growing up, I always found kidney beans in the chili, that's my mom's contribution.  Kidneys are those big dark red guys.  That's a northern thing, Yankee chili if you will.  Get rid of them.  Pinto beans are the bean of choice, the bean of the great Southwest.  Pinto beans go in your chili.  Sometimes I use Great Northern beans.  When I feel real daring, I use a can of each.  Use whatever bean you like, it's your chili after all, but I draw the line at Black beans.  They taste good, but they are just too trendy for me.  Don't even think about Garbanzo beans.  Some cowboys think chili shouldn't have beans at all.  If that's the way you want to play, leave the cheese off a pizza, too.  Screw 'em, beans is in.

My personal rule of thumb is one can of beans for each pound of meat.

Here's a thought.  Dump a can of pintos onto an oiled skillet, and maybe some finely diced onion or garlic, mash them up into a relatively smooth consistency and heat gently til they bubble.  Serve it up with tortilla chips and some salsa.  You just made refried beans or frijoles.

Like tomatoes?  ( I'm back to chili.)  Throw in a can of stewed tomatoes, or maybe a cup of crushed tomatoes.  If you get the whole kind, chop them up, otherwise buy diced.  I like mine pureed, but if you like big red hunks of tomato, go for it.

Now we have the basic pot of chili, as yet unseasoned.  Let it simmer.  Cover it to keep it soupy.  Simmering uncovered will allow moisture to escape and it will slowly cook down and thicken.  Your choice.  About fifteen minutes before serving, dump in the beans so they will heat.  If you add the beans at the beginning, they will cook into mush.  Of course, if you go for that texture...

The seasoning.  This is what makes it really chili.  Let's face it, what we have so far could become spaghetti, chili, or even sloppy joes.  Herbs and spices, hmmm...   Colonel Sanders is gone, so we can't ask him about it.  The herbs make the difference, the spices just liven it up and make it interesting.  Basil and oregano are the defining herbs for spaghetti, leave them on the shelf.  Oregano also makes your mouth think:  pizza.  Wrong again.  Ground cumin is the herb that makes chili taste like chili.  Start with a tablespoon or two  of cumin, add more if you like.  Remember a long simmer wakes up the flavors.  Unlike sugar or Tabasco, this stuff doesn't work instantly.  The flavor will be stronger tomorrow.  Let it cook for a few minutes before you add more. 

Yes, of course you're supposed to taste it all the while you're cooking. 

Hot pepper is next.  I use several dried varieties in the pot.  "Ground red pepper" is usually Cayenne.  Other types such as piquins, and others each add their own flavors.  The oriental markets have a good selection.  I keep three or four on my shelf.  I use lots, but it is up to you.  How hot do you want it?  For you sissy types, paprika is a mild cousin.  Paprika peppers are dried and ground just like the hot peppers.  Paprika comes in quite a few types, with subtle flavor differences.  I usually use paprika and peppers both.  Hey, leave out the cumin and add lots of paprika, mix it with macaroni, you get goulash.  Some other time.

I don't use Tabasco much because of the vinegar content.  Try some sriracha in its place sometime.  You can find it at an oriental grocery, and many grocery stores now have it in the Chinese food section.  Squirt some in chip dip.  A Ritz cracker with cream cheese and a blob of sriracha is a favorite snack around here.  Nibble on that and some fresh jalopenos while we cook the chili.

Dry mustard adds zip.  Try a teaspoon or two or three.  Use the dry mustard powder, not the stuff in a jar like you put on a hot dog.  Prepared mustard is full of vinegar, not a good flavor for chili.  A little celery salt or powder never hurts.  Chili Powder?  I never use it.  Look at the ingredients:  red pepper, cumin, onion powder, etc.  We already put that stuff in.  Don't forget our old friend black pepper.  I also like to visit the oriental grocery and get various hot sauces.  I use sriracha sauce in everything.  A few tablespoons of Vietnamese hot sauce livens up my chili.  Hot bean paste is handy, it adds heat and texture.  My regular grocery store now carries sriracha even.

I don't give a damn what the Heart Association says, put some salt in it.  No salt, tastes watery.  Period.  The salt police are always suggesting we use lemon instead in our cooking.  Yeah, right.

Some guys thicken their chili with masa (corn flower), but I think that is cheating.  If you want thicker chili, cook it down.  Worth the wait and the chili won’t taste like corn mush.

A bowl of chili does like to have some Saltine crackers along side, just for moral support.

Well, that's how I make chili.  Each pot is different, but there is an overall theme to mine.  You must establish your own approach to chili.  I like to eat straight chili the first day, but the next day I like to put it over steamed rice.  I am working on a stir-fry oriental chili.  What's next?  Try adding some whale blubber for Free Willy Chili.  Or try this, get someone else to make up a pot full, but pretend you cooked it yourself.  That's Milli Vanilli Chili.

So give it a try.  Like the man says, it ain’t rocket surgery.



Basic ingredients
beef
onions and garlic
hot peppers
tomato sauce
beer
beans
water
seasonings:  red pepper, paprika, cumin, sriracha sauce, mustard, celery salt, black pepper, salt.



t.m.Enzo

J M Fahey

  • SSGuitar Global Mod
  • Legendary
  • ****
  • Posts: 4141
  • Chip Points: 429
    • View Profile
Re: Help Diagnosing Reverb Drive & Return Circuit?
« Reply #9 on: December 11, 2015, 11:16:19 AM »
Ok, just started soaking 1/2 kilo of black beans (I love them and have been eating white Navy beans for the last few days) , I'll boil them tomorrow (I avoid canned stuff if I can cook my own) , will get some good meat tomorrow, probably dice it with a sharp knife so it keeps flavor and juices better than ground beef, and if all is well, should have some nice Chili for Sunday.

Some stuff is unavailable, (what's siracha, by the way?  :o ), others , such as North American chilis will be substituted with equally fiery South American versions, I don't worry about that  8)

Following your guidelines of course  :dbtu: :dbtu: :dbtu:

Enzo

  • Legendary
  • ******
  • Posts: 1839
  • Chip Points: 189
    • View Profile
Re: Help Diagnosing Reverb Drive & Return Circuit?
« Reply #10 on: December 11, 2015, 04:30:03 PM »
Sriracha is Vietnamese hot sauce.   Hot chili-garlic sauce.  It used to be esoteric, but has gone main stream, I can buy more than one brand in my local groceries.  But certainly it is in any oriental grocery.  All the Asian grocers I see cover most oriental cuisines.  So I never worry if the people running it are Chinese, Korean, Viet Namese, or whatever.

In local diners, traditionally if you ask for hot sauce, they have Tabasco, or the very similar Franks, but these days it is vey common for them to have sriracha too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T9NYHfluxcY&feature=player_embedded

Sriracha comes in a squeeze bottle.  There is a similar stuff in a jar called sambal, among other names.  it too is a chili garlic concoction.

The sriracha story:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tXOAx58LBDo

J M Fahey

  • SSGuitar Global Mod
  • Legendary
  • ****
  • Posts: 4141
  • Chip Points: 429
    • View Profile
Re: Help Diagnosing Reverb Drive & Return Circuit?
« Reply #11 on: December 12, 2015, 12:55:18 AM »
Then I might get it.

We have our own Chinatown , a Koreatown and a few Japanese Supermarkets, I *have*  bought a Chinese Hot Chili Sauce, very smooth and creamy, think "red condensed milk" in texture, and not long ago saw a chili+garlic one, probably very close to what you mention.

Not available in flexible tubes, but in 1 kilo / 2 pound glass jars, think marmalade type.

Probably not many Family type users, so they straight import the larger Restaurant sizes.

On Tuesday it's my Birthday, might very well invite close Family to some Chinatown Restaurant and check for the sauce.

Anyway I go there regularly to buy chinese rice flour pasta and fresh Tofu, Melona ice cream and that weird chewing gum flavoured soda..

phatt

  • Legendary
  • ******
  • Posts: 2005
  • Chip Points: 238
    • View Profile
Re: Help Diagnosing Reverb Drive & Return Circuit?
« Reply #12 on: December 12, 2015, 06:01:17 AM »
You two are starting to worry me,, two of the best teck heads around and one makes some kinda strange bean soup while the other drinks gummmy soda.  :loco   :P ;)
Phil.

J M Fahey

  • SSGuitar Global Mod
  • Legendary
  • ****
  • Posts: 4141
  • Chip Points: 429
    • View Profile
Re: Help Diagnosing Reverb Drive & Return Circuit?
« Reply #13 on: December 12, 2015, 07:56:49 AM »
Well, now's your turn to add some tasty Vegemite based recipes ;)

phatt

  • Legendary
  • ******
  • Posts: 2005
  • Chip Points: 238
    • View Profile
Re: Help Diagnosing Reverb Drive & Return Circuit?
« Reply #14 on: December 15, 2015, 02:05:16 AM »
Oh that's an easy one. Toast, Butter and a smattering of Vegemite.
Then for afternoon tea it's Anzac biscuits dunked in a cuppa tea.  :P
Phil.

 

* User Controls

 
 
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

* Recent Posts

* Sponsors