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Author Topic: convert Line 6 guitar amp to battery powered  (Read 3635 times)

jshphysicist

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convert Line 6 guitar amp to battery powered
« on: August 03, 2013, 09:23:54 PM »
Hi,

I have a working Line 6 Spider III 150 Watt amp which runs by wall current, 120 VAC.  I need to convert it to battery powered so that I can play outside.  My landlord says I can only play my electric guitar with headphones now.  I hate this new rule, but have to adapt.

I prefer not to convert from DC up to AC back to DC.  It's wasteful and I'd get very little time from a car battery.

I've unbolted the control part from the speaker cabinet.  The power supply (labeled On-Tech LX-8665-02H0) has the 110VAC going in, and eight wires coming out:

(2) black wires
(3) red wires
(2) blue wires
(1) yellow wire

My next step is to take a DVM to the different wires, see what they are putting out (I assume they are all DC but might be wrong here) then figure out a way to get a battery to supply me these different voltages.

Any input would be most appreciated.  Thanks, john
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J M Fahey

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Re: convert Line 6 guitar amp to battery powered
« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2013, 05:05:38 AM »
Quote
I prefer not to convert from DC up to AC back to DC.  It's wasteful and I'd get very little time from a car battery.

There's no other way.

Plus it's not necessarily unefficient.

The main problem is that it is a 150W amplifier, probably pulling some 250W from the wall ... or battery.
That's your limiting point.

What does "outside" exactly mean?

If your backyard or something, a long extension cord will work wonders.

If miles away, I'd rather build a small 5 or 10W battery powered amp, and use some multi-effects pedal as a front end.

Moving a 150W amp and a car battery around, is cumbersome to say the least.

phatt

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Re: convert Line 6 guitar amp to battery powered
« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2013, 07:00:32 AM »
I'm with JM Fahey, 150 watts from battery,, Nup.  xP

Anyway, How big is this thing? Seems many spider 3 models exist? 
So are you sure you don't mean the 15 watt model? In which case you just need a medium power inverter unit as Mr Fahey has mentioned.

Power consumption from mains is usually written on the back next to the power cord inlet. Use that number as a guide to how big the inverter has to be.

BTW, some people confuse that label with Actual Amplifier Wattage delivered at speaker. Amplifier wattage output is much less than that number.
Phil.

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Re: convert Line 6 guitar amp to battery powered
« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2013, 12:56:28 PM »
It seems that this is indeed a 150 watt output amp (so I'm not surprised your landlord is upset), and as such will draw something like twice that power from the mains.

Powering this from a battery+inverter isn't really a practical proposition and amps of this size are generally powered from a motor-generator when remote operation is required.

But frankly, just about anywhere you take a 150 watt guitar amp "outside", apart from perhaps the Gobi desert, is very likely to attract unwelcome attention.



I'd suggest that you look at getting a much smaller amp of the "busker" class for your outside ventures, intended to run for a long time from small batteries (and not stir up too much trouble in the 'hood).
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Kaz Kylheku

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Re: convert Line 6 guitar amp to battery powered
« Reply #4 on: August 14, 2013, 07:02:34 PM »
Landlord says you have to use phones? Really, so nobody can watch TV in your building or listen to music? Or play video games? Or have conversation with friends? Or vacuum the place?

Why don't you play at a level that is below 70 dB, and quieter than that after hours?

Converting to batteries to play outside is not the answer!  Where do you live, and is the weather/climate always good?

What if you get inspired in the middle of a hurricane, or snow blizzard, or heat wave?

Here is an idea: tilt or raise your cabinet so that it's pointed at your head. Don't sit or stand next to the amp so that it's blowing sound past your ankles. You can knock numerous decibels off if you do this, and enjoy a raw, close-miced-like tone at the same time with less room reflection.

Make sure you have plenty of furniture and coverings in the room for sound absorption.

Watch for too much bass in your tone. Those palm-muted, low-end "brootalz" will get through walls.

By the way, the wattage of this amp means nothing, unless you're cranking it. A 5W amp can get you in trouble in a rental building, depending on how you use it.  A low wattage amp is not the answer: the answer is, turn the damn thing down and respect quiet hours. You only need a different amp if the 150W unit sounds like crap at low volume. (Which, in practical terms, would mean it's a tube amp, so that point is moot. :lmao:)
« Last Edit: August 14, 2013, 07:12:40 PM by Kaz Kylheku »
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joecool85

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Re: convert Line 6 guitar amp to battery powered
« Reply #5 on: August 19, 2013, 10:13:06 AM »
I'm with Kaz, just turn it down.
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