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Author Topic: difference between a SOLID STATE AMP and a TUBE one  (Read 3901 times)

giosmrbig

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difference between a SOLID STATE AMP and a TUBE one
« on: August 14, 2009, 04:04:42 PM »
maybe this sounds like a stupid question, but i would like to know

technically what is the difference between a SOLID STATE AMP, and a TUBE AMPLIFIER.

SOLID STATE means TRANSISTOR AMP ?

PS
sorry i'm not a guitarrist, just curious ! ;)

Enzo

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Re: difference between a SOLID STATE AMP and a TUBE one
« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2009, 12:18:43 AM »
Some people refer to vacuum tube stuff as "hollow state."

SOlid state basically refers to non-tube stuff.  SOlid state includes transistors as well as integrated circuits.

In a vacuum tube, electrons leave a cathode, and fly through empty space - the vacuum - until they reach the plate of the tube.  In transistors, the electrons flow through solid matter the whole time.

The distinction between transistors and integrated circuits is largely one of semantics, since integrated circuits are really made up of many transistors all in one part.

You will sometimes see an amp or circuit referred to as "hybrid."  That means the circuit includes both tube and transistor circuits.

giosmrbig

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Re: difference between a SOLID STATE AMP and a TUBE one
« Reply #2 on: August 15, 2009, 05:01:53 AM »
thanks for the reply... very interesting..... ;)