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April 16, 2021, 03:06:08 AM

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11
Amplifier Discussion / Re: Ampeg SS-150H cutting out
« Last post by Enzo on April 11, 2021, 11:31:31 PM »
"Dirt" in the jacks does not refer to visual grunge, it refers to electrical dirt.  Contact surfaces oxidize or build up a film of foreign matter.  This happens to ANY amp of ANY brand that has FX loop jacks.

You need to clean the cutout contacts, not just the parts a plug touches.
12
Amplifier Discussion / Re: Ampeg SS-150H cutting out
« Last post by Pepe on April 11, 2021, 08:46:49 PM »
I tried the cable jump method and it seems to work okay, channel a is good and channel b seems a little off but is doable. What causes this issue?

I assume this means you are placing a cable connecting the effects loop in and outs. Dirt, corrosion and worn out metal switching contacts are all possible reasons for the cutting out. But I don't see effects loop on the schematic so I am not sure if this is what you meant.

Yeah that's pretty much what I did

If the audio cuts out like clock work then it is always possible there is a cold solder joint. I would then input a test signal into the amp and when it cuts out I would scope or trace the signal in the amp. I would confirm preamp and power amp voltage while it is working and after it cuts out.

It's not always on time, but it happens within that time frame. I'll try that out and see what pops up.
13
Amplifier Discussion / Re: Ampeg SS-150H cutting out
« Last post by Pepe on April 11, 2021, 08:39:07 PM »
There should be an FX loop on the rear.  Lower right corner.  Just below the FS jack.

If patching a cord across the FX loop restores the sound, then your return jack needs service.

Considering how dusty and unused it seems to be, I would assume it just needs a thorough cleaning. Since this is my first ampeg, Im not sure how these amps behave when they become dirty (if that would have any effect at all on these amps).
14
Schematics and Layouts / Roland JC-40 Schematic
« Last post by willpirkle on April 11, 2021, 05:32:10 PM »
Anyone got the schematic for the new(er) JC-40 with 2x10” speakers? I am aware of the awesome JC-120 ultimate thread on this forum and also found the JC-50 schematics here as well. But now specifically seeking the JC-40.

Thanks,

Will
15
Amplifier Discussion / Re: Ampeg SS-150H cutting out
« Last post by Enzo on April 11, 2021, 05:25:38 PM »
There should be an FX loop on the rear.  Lower right corner.  Just below the FS jack.

If patching a cord across the FX loop restores the sound, then your return jack needs service.
16
Amplifier Discussion / Re: Ampeg SS-150H cutting out
« Last post by DrGonz78 on April 11, 2021, 03:22:38 PM »
I tried the cable jump method and it seems to work okay, channel a is good and channel b seems a little off but is doable. What causes this issue?

I assume this means you are placing a cable connecting the effects loop in and outs. Dirt, corrosion and worn out metal switching contacts are all possible reasons for the cutting out. But I don't see effects loop on the schematic so I am not sure if this is what you meant.

If the audio cuts out like clock work then it is always possible there is a cold solder joint. I would then input a test signal into the amp and when it cuts out I would scope or trace the signal in the amp. I would confirm preamp and power amp voltage while it is working and after it cuts out.
17
Amplifier Discussion / Ampeg SS-150H cutting out
« Last post by Pepe on April 11, 2021, 12:49:21 PM »
Hey guys, I'm nee here and I'm not entirely sure if this is the correct section to post a repair question, if so I apologize.

I recently purchased an ampeg ss150 head off of reverb. When it arrived, it seemed like it had been sitting for a very long time, dust was really caked on this thing. The previous owner said he cleaned out the pots, it plays well but cuts out after 10 or so minutes. It happens in both channel A and B, once it cuts out I will play with the volume to try and get it to produce sound again. Sometimes that method works, sometimes it doesn't. I tried the cable jump method and it seems to work okay, channel a is good and channel b seems a little off but is doable. What causes this issue?
18
Honey Amp / Getting started with your Honey Amp
« Last post by joecool85 on April 03, 2021, 09:05:08 PM »
Thanks for purchasing your Honey Amp!  Time to put it together and start making music!

None of the parts in your kit will be labeled to match component numbers in the schematic.  IE, a capacitor won't be labeled "C1."  This means that you need to know how to read component values.  Luckily, this isn't difficult and there are a lot of resources to help you along the way.

AMZ's Capacitor Calculator: http://www.muzique.com/schem/caps.htm
Capacitors have varying types of labels on them.  Electrolytic capacitors (they look like tiny soda cans) are usually labeled with plain text that will tell you the size and maximum voltage of the capacitor (10uF / 63v etc).  Pretty much all other capacitors use a code.  To break this down, use the link above.

Resistor Calculator: https://www.resistor-calculator.com/
Resistors don't typically have values printed in numbers on them.  Instead, resistors use color bands.
 Thankfully there are charts, graphs, and calculators online available to help you decode this color band system - I like this one for it's simplicity.  It's easy to use, and it makes it easy to start learning how the color codes work so they make sense.

The rest should be pretty straight forward by following the silk screening on the PCB.  IE - it shows the direction to put the IC in, same with transistor and even diodes.

Now that you have identified your components, it's time to start soldering.

Always start with the shortest objects first.  When I say this, I mean the components that are the closest to the board.  In the case of the Honey Amp, it works well to start with the 1n4148 diode and resistors.  Put them in place, bend the leads slightly and then turn the board over.  Solder them on and then clip the remaining lead.  Continue on until you have installed the tallest component.  Now you are ready for off-board wiring.
19
Honey Amp / Honey Amp Docs
« Last post by joecool85 on April 01, 2021, 09:37:12 PM »
Enjoy  :tu:
20
Honey Amp / Honey Amp FAQ
« Last post by joecool85 on April 01, 2021, 09:27:41 PM »
Q: Why was the SSG-AMP-1 kit eventually called the "Honey Amp"?
A: My first build using the printed PCBs went into a tea tin.  The second one went into a Honeywell HVAC control box.  I trimmed the "we" in Honeywell and it made "Honeywell" (Honey II).  This means the first one was the Honey and I decided to go with the name.

Q: Where can I purchase a Honey Amp kit?
A: Currently these are not for sale.  The kickstarter has finished and I am mid-process shipping the kits out from that.  Once this is completed, I will be adding a store section to SSGuitar.com where you can purchase a kit then.

Q: How much power can I expect this to make?
A: The power output is dependent primarily on impedance of the speaker the amplifier is connected to as well as the supply voltage applied to the board.  Obviously there also needs to be sufficient input signal strength.  Maximum power for this board is 1.6w on a 16 ohm load using 16v supply voltage.  Using an 8 ohm speaker the maximum power output is going to be 0.85w powered by a 12v supply.  And lowest power comes from a 4 ohm speaker on a 9v supply coming in at only 0.35w.

Q: Can I use this for electric bass?
A: You sure can!  If using this for electric bass, you will want to adjust the output capacitor from the stock 470uF to somewhere around 2,000uF.  You will also probably want to make some changes to the tone stack (adjusted to taste).  Please remember that using a proper electric bass speaker will really be necessary to make this sound decent.

Q: Can I play music through this (mp3 player, cell phone etc)?
A: No problem!  I do this regularly with mine, it works great to drive some speakers for my desk when I want to listen to music on my laptop.  Use the aux input on the board and crank up some tunes!

Q: What about power supply?  What should I use?
A: Most little amps like this end up being powered by batteries, but any stable DC voltage supply ranging from 6v to 18v will work depending on what impedance you have hooked to it.  Recommended max voltage for 4 ohm will be 9v, max for 8 ohm is 14v, max for 16 ohm is 16v.

Q: Can I get clean tones from this amp?
A: While this amp does best for crunchy tones, it does have some tasty clean sounds as well - just at lower volumes.  To get this dialed in, start with gain all the way down and volume at half.  Turn your volume up to the desired level (it may well be maxed out and that is okay).  Then slowly turn the gain knob up until it starts to get a little distortion, back it down just below that point and that is the loudest clean setting you can get.
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