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Author Topic: Wiring help  (Read 4233 times)

ShadowSpectrum

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Wiring help
« on: January 21, 2007, 01:22:45 AM »
I need help with some guitar wiring. Can anyone draw up a schematic or explain to me how I would go about wiring a single humbucker directly to an input jack, no switching, no pots.

Thanks

joecool85

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Re: Wiring help
« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2007, 07:30:21 AM »
No schematic needed.  There should be two wires, a black and a white (sometimes some other color).  Solder the black wire to the ring and the other wire to the tip connector.  Thats it, should be good to go.
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ShadowSpectrum

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Re: Wiring help
« Reply #2 on: January 23, 2007, 04:03:14 PM »
Thanks, but I've decided I want to add an on/off switch. I have a 3 way toggle laying around that I can use, any ideas on what I could use the third position for? on-off-? I cant use it for a coil tap, I'm pretty sure you need 4 conductor wires, which my humbucker doesn't have.

teemuk

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Re: Wiring help
« Reply #3 on: January 23, 2007, 07:18:30 PM »
I'm a bit newbie with inboard guitar electronics stuff and haven't really messed with them (except from doing the simple "treble bleeder" mod) but I suppose that even in this case the common standard is to connect sleeve to common ("ground") and tip to signal. The wiring doesn't really matter with mono (TS) jacks and plugs but if I remeber right some active electronics get their supply via the ring connector. Sleeve is the standard connection for common and it's best to learn to follow those rules at the beginning.

Much of the guitar pickup's tone shaping relies on defining the resonant frequency, which is a result of pickups inductance and winding inductance damped by wiring resistance. The winding capacitance is usually in parallel with capacitance of guitar's tone control and further on damped by the resistances of tone control and volume potentiometer. This is the reason why people like to keep their guitars "dimed" and bypass the volume potentiometer with a "bleed" capacitor. If I may suggest, get rid of all the resistances but play around with parallel capacitance value. Preferably make it switchable.