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Author Topic: Marshall 2199 cap replacement oscillation issue  (Read 8534 times)

phatt

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Re: Marshall 2199 cap replacement oscillation issue
« Reply #15 on: October 31, 2016, 07:21:20 AM »

C21 in the M2199 Circuit is 100uF which means more bass is passing through the power amp.
It also is driving a 2 Ohm load which would likely result in very poor low freq at high volume.

Now the same capacitor on the 5010 circuit is C22 which is 22uF so less bass is passed often giving a clearer sound at high volume. Good idea for most guitar circuits :tu:
Also it drives a more sane 4 Ohm load so it's a far better circuit.

You could just change that Cap and disconnect one speaker in the 2199 and see if it improves. If you do try this also add a zobel network like the 5010 (C23 and R32),,, helps stability. :tu:
Phil.

solidstate2199

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Re: Marshall 2199 cap replacement oscillation issue
« Reply #16 on: December 01, 2016, 04:57:29 PM »
Hi i want to update my thread because i have bought the 5010 amp
now, which i wanted the 2199 (modded) to sound like.
these amps are day and night.  the 5010 has a very classic acdc to 80s
metal rock distortion- you cant do that with stock 2199.

which i really liked about the 2199 was the ability to go from moderate crunchy to
very clean just with the guitar volume, i mean really clean not marshall clean.

i really hoped i could do that with the 5010 to and i have to say that it doesnt do it.
it goes clean(ish) but not that amount. sucks.

here my personal resumee.. i tried many of the 80s and 70s marshall solid states,
infact almost every model, plus the first valvestate 8100 100watt head,
mosfet head, 3203 Artist Hybrid Heads and none of these can do what their tube equals can do (2203/04;2210/05).

Either they plainly sound shitty, feel shitty,no sustain, dont clean up with the volume, are dull, the 8100 doesnt even slightly clean up it just get more mushy till you cant hear it anymore.
i really wanted to have the solid state thing work out for me...but it just doesnt.

i tried fender and vox solid states too, not much better or worse.

maybe its just me but i think i sell all my ss of and get 1 or 2 good old tube marshalls
to end the charade. peavey supreme or xxl i will maybe try out, but i have no good feeling.

i dont want to break loose any tube vs solid state campaign but it seems like it doesnt
work for me. to me the marshall 2203/04 has it all, power, big bottom end,master volume so you can even play it on bedroom volume with preamp all the way up and it sounds better than all (good!) Marshall SS together, roll back the guitar volume and it cleans up very good. even the 2210 channel switcher cleans up as good.

Does anybody know of a solid State amp no matter what maker that does this well,
playing a good distorted rhythm sound roll back and have a nice real clean sound which isnt much much lower in volume than the full on sound?
cheers
« Last Edit: December 02, 2016, 05:33:56 PM by solidstate2199 »

Enzo

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Re: Marshall 2199 cap replacement oscillation issue
« Reply #17 on: December 01, 2016, 06:47:27 PM »
There are so many SS amps out there, and they all differ.  I think a PV 80s amp will sound very different from a MArshall of the era.  You mentioned some later era PV amps, but don't overlook some 80s ones, they are built like tanks, and you like the tone or you don't.  If you get a chance to try one, take the time.  An old Tuck and roll Kustom sounds pretty good to me, not like others.  Sleepers like old Acoustic MIGHT be interesting.  Even tube amps have a wide range of sounds.  Surely a Fender Twin Reverb sounds nothing like a Marshall 100 watt.  SO I'd not dwell on the solid state-ness so much as just looking at various families of amps.  Peavey Transtube series amps sound good to me, and they come in a variety of flavors.  I don't think Fender can design a distortion amp to save their souls, but I do like the sound or a Princeton Stereo Chorus, so you never know.

phatt

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Re: Marshall 2199 cap replacement oscillation issue
« Reply #18 on: December 02, 2016, 01:30:56 AM »
Hi SS2199,
Yes without the Magic Compression that comes standard on a lot of Glass amps a lot of SS amps don't really nail the dynamics, especially the smaller models. :'(
Also you need to realize that even the PU's can make a difference to the way the crunch happens.
If the circuit is overly hot then hot wound PU's will make clean roll off even harder to achieve.

You need to consider the PU/ amp combination as they are interdependent. 8|

My setup is tweaked for lower output PU's but If I use a humbucker loaded axe a lot of that touch sensitivity is lost. With really hot PU's ,, no chance of cleanup without a lot of knob turning on the pedals.
I use a compressor which adds to the dynamic Over driven effect.

I've posted a short clip so you can hear how the dynamics work.
The amplifier is all SS clean so it's all done by my pedal board there are no exotic pedals in use only a Fet boost, Boss OS2, Phabbtone, delay, and some spring reverb.
Recorded via the lap top mic so might sound a bit cardboard box in places but should give you an idea of what is possible even without Valves.
No post processing just converted to mp3

I'm only using the guitar volume,, the pedals are preset and not touched.
The guitar is a bitza cheap knock off and the PU's are about the cheapest money can buy,, these come standard on those $199 Strat knock offs the music shops sell.

Regard the Circuit; If I'm reading the right schematic then you could try,,,
Raising the value of R8 (which looks like 470R) on the 2nd opamp as that will back off the drive. (try 1k) I've found that below 500 Ohms can cause instability.

Have fun,,Phil.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2016, 01:48:06 AM by phatt »

solidstate2199

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Re: Marshall 2199 cap replacement oscillation issue
« Reply #19 on: June 23, 2017, 11:47:52 AM »
Hi Guys,

as always thanks for your tips and suggestions,
much appreciated.

I wanted to give a little update on my initial post
regarding the Marshall 2199 Oscillation problem due to
a nuked out capacitor.

I did the repair the other day, replaced the knocked off capacitor and
et voila! the oscillation is gone.

To my surprise this particular 2199 out of my currently 3 sounds
definitely better than the other two. Nice classic 60s to early 80s
Marshall crunch can be achieved. The sound doesnt get overly harsh
like on the other 2 and all 3 Inputs can be used, even the bright one.

With this model its really hit or miss. One big downfall
is the cabinet construction, its very "beaming" as soon as you step
a little away to the side the perceived sound gets very mushy.

Still, im happy that this one works properly now and doesnt sound
as bad as the other two.

Cheers.

Enzo

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Re: Marshall 2199 cap replacement oscillation issue
« Reply #20 on: June 23, 2017, 12:03:48 PM »
That is why they make "beam blockers".

https://www.tedweber.com/wbb12-4

Easy to install, and they are effective at spreading the sound and killing that ray-gun beam straight out the front.

solidstate2199

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Re: Marshall 2199 cap replacement oscillation issue
« Reply #21 on: June 23, 2017, 12:10:22 PM »
Thanks for the tip Enzo, :dbtu:

i will try the oldschool duct tape trick or
McGyver me some beamblockers.

Enzo

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Re: Marshall 2199 cap replacement oscillation issue
« Reply #22 on: June 23, 2017, 05:44:25 PM »
Or cut the dust dome off a dead speaker and glue it to a stick.